Announcement

Collapse

TGC Tour 2021-2022

Join the most exciting Golf Simulator Tour!

Tournaments are open to golfers of all ages and skill levels. Get in on the excitement of Golf Simulator Tours, Challenges and Tournaments: https://golfsimulatortours.com
See more
See less

Soundproofing 101

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Soundproofing 101

    This discussion will probably be in four posts because of the size of the information discussed.

    Soundproofing golf sim room can be problematic. What works? The answer is it depends on your goals and the space you are dealing with. Sound proofing is measure by reducing the amount of sound that is transmitted from one space to another. Soundproofing is generally measured by STC (Sound Transmission Class).


    I recommend that you shoot for and STC rating no less than 57. I planned on an STC of 60 with my setup. I figure if I get 58, I will be gold with the wife!

    I did a lot of research on soundproofing for a golf room addition I am doing. Below is a layman’s discussion of some of the options. Hopefully, some of you guys may benefit from the below.

    Here is a typical chart showing what type of noise and related STC rating.
    Last edited by Kaos; 03-17-2021, 02:41 AM.

  • #16
    If that is the screen end, box out the upper area of the wall that is the tube area, as your screen won’t be that tall and even if it is, your screen will deflect maybe 14” and that will only be with a driver which has a lower launch angle and thus the deflection will be about 4 ft up. If you box out the upper tub section you would never see it and it will be sure to stop the sound travel. If its not the screen end, then ignore this. Lol 😆.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by pwade3 View Post
      If that is the screen end, box out the upper area of the wall that is the tube area, as your screen won’t be that tall and even if it is, your screen will deflect maybe 14” and that will only be with a driver which has a lower launch angle and thus the deflection will be about 4 ft up. If you box out the upper tub section you would never see it and it will be sure to stop the sound travel. If its not the screen end, then ignore this. Lol 😆.
      The screen is being put at the other end. So I am hitting opposite that wall. I am planning on placing the SIG12 screen (from shopindoorgolf) approximately 14" from the front wall where the sliding door is. I will have heavy sound dampening curtains between the screen and door for added soundproofing and protection of the door. I am thinking maybe adding an angle section there and maybe placing a couple of recessed lights there and really packing that area with insulation. Alternatively, I am considering adding some 2x4 studs straight up and leaving out the recessed lights from that area. He may even come up with another idea. Ideally, I would love to create enough space where he can go full R38, sound clips and hat channel in that area and I think that will do it.

      Comment


      • #18
        To address my concern relating to the bathroom floor issue noted in prior post, we installed some additional studs to allow for full installation of Rockwool insulation along with related sound clips and hat channel. We are going to stuff the openings with fiberglass and then use the Rockwool in between the studs. I had my doubts when imagining the additional studs, But, I think that jutted out section of the wall actually lends the wall a little character. Framer added one additional ceiling joist that will add additional mass above the studs. When combined with the R38 Rockwool in the ceiling, I should be good to go.

        Comment


        • pwade3
          pwade3 commented
          Editing a comment
          Thats great. Excellent choice. That should work out really well. Wife will be happy. Lol 😆

      • #19
        Originally posted by Kaos View Post
        To address my concern relating to the bathroom floor issue noted in prior post, we installed some additional studs to allow for full installation of Rockwool insulation along with related sound clips and hat channel. We are going to stuff the openings with fiberglass and then use the Rockwool in between the studs. I had my doubts when imagining the additional studs, But, I think that jutted out section of the wall actually lends the wall a little character. Framer added one additional ceiling joist that will add additional mass above the studs. When combined with the R38 Rockwool in the ceiling, I should be good to go.
        That is the idea!. I would hate to not be able to use the room without getting an earful every time from wife! Lol

        Comment


        • #20
          Originally posted by pwade3 View Post
          Are you sound proofing interior walls? I have been looking into the offsetting of the wall studs but that won’t work in our climate as the R value is not sufficient to do that. As excellent as offset studs is, its just not an option for me, but thanks for the heads up on that. I am constructing an outdoor building so all walls are exterior. I will need the 2x6 wall studs for the insulation. I will use 5/8 Quietrock drywall, rockwool insulation and OSB on exterior as it is better at sound dampening then plywood. I will then have smart board siding over the obs so will have layers that will help with dampening the sound. Still working on windows. Apparently there is a sound damping glass that can be used, but I have no data on its effectiveness and what it costs.
          I meant to ask you that instead of the Quietrock why not consider the following as an alternative. I would recommend that you investigate using 5/8 Type C drywall (not Type X). When combined with the Rockwool insulation, especially with your added wall thickness and I assume additional R value, I would think you could achieve what you want at a lot less cost. With 2x4 studs and R19 fiberglass and the same sound clips and hat channel I am using, your estimated STC rating would be 60. I think the Rockwool would do a little better with that setup. That is pretty darn good. I am sure you can do a little better with the thicker walls and higher value Rockwool and related clips and hat channel. The Quiet rock is excellent, but man the cost of sound board is off the planet! In my case it was simply cost prohibitive. I would recommend that you see if you can get an estimated STC rating with the Quietrock versus the setup I suggested to see if it justifies the cost. If you only gain 3-5 STC, you can probably get that increase by adding an additional layer of 1/2 or 5/8 Type C drywall (if your room dimension allows (comparing cost of potential added W&L with thicker walls to adding Quietrock).

          Comment


          • preludesam
            preludesam commented
            Editing a comment
            I agreed STC is just extra mass. If it’s cheaper to double the layers then you will probably get the same if not better results.

        • #21
          Originally posted by Kaos View Post

          I meant to ask you that instead of the Quietrock why not consider the following as an alternative. I would recommend that you investigate using 5/8 Type C drywall (not Type X). When combined with the Rockwool insulation, especially with your added wall thickness and I assume additional R value, I would think you could achieve what you want at a lot less cost. With 2x4 studs and R19 fiberglass and the same sound clips and hat channel I am using, your estimated STC rating would be 60. I think the Rockwool would do a little better with that setup. That is pretty darn good. I am sure you can do a little better with the thicker walls and higher value Rockwool and related clips and hat channel. The Quiet rock is excellent, but man the cost of sound board is off the planet! In my case it was simply cost prohibitive. I would recommend that you see if you can get an estimated STC rating with the Quietrock versus the setup I suggested to see if it justifies the cost. If you only gain 3-5 STC, you can probably get that increase by adding an additional layer of 1/2 or 5/8 Type C drywall (if your room dimension allows (comparing cost of potential added W&L with thicker walls to adding Quietrock).
          Ok, I am going to have a good look at what you suggest. You are right about the cost of Quietrock. Its very expensive where I live. Lumber has also gone through the roof. Our lumber prices have almost doubled since the start of Covid. I’m not on a budget, but I also don’t like to throw money out the window if its not required. I will figure out the cost of Quietrock verses doubling Type C drywall. The issue I have with doubling is that it seems that green glue as a sound absorbing matter should be used in between the sheets to give you full effect of doubling the sheets, which looks to be very time consuming and thus is going to lead to additional cost of the drywall installation. It would still be less then the Quietrock, but brings it closer.
          I am also going to look at Sonopan panels. Cost per panel is more then doubling type C but does not require green glue and easier to install. I am not sure of the sound benefits yet but will be researching. Have you heard of it?

          Comment


          • #22
            Originally posted by pwade3 View Post

            Ok, I am going to have a good look at what you suggest. You are right about the cost of Quietrock. Its very expensive where I live. Lumber has also gone through the roof. Our lumber prices have almost doubled since the start of Covid. I’m not on a budget, but I also don’t like to throw money out the window if its not required. I will figure out the cost of Quietrock verses doubling Type C drywall. The issue I have with doubling is that it seems that green glue as a sound absorbing matter should be used in between the sheets to give you full effect of doubling the sheets, which looks to be very time consuming and thus is going to lead to additional cost of the drywall installation. It would still be less then the Quietrock, but brings it closer.
            I am also going to look at Sonopan panels. Cost per panel is more then doubling type C but does not require green glue and easier to install. I am not sure of the sound benefits yet but will be researching. Have you heard of it?
            From what I have seen, Sonopan is a decent product. The wall assembly for an STC rating of 56 for that product was with fiberglass insulation, 2x4 studs, Sonopan, then hat channel (with no sound clips) and two layers of drywall (I think the two layers were 1/2"). My recommendation gets you an estimated 60 STC with 2x4, R19 fiberglass, sound clips, hat channel and 5/8 Type C. As I said, I think you can beat 60 STC with my suggestion using your 2x6 studs with say R23 Rockwool, CLARKDIETRICH SOUND CLIPS and CHANNEL with on one layer of 5/8 Type C drywall. I understand though the Sonopan is pretty good on low frequency noise, but I have not seen an independent reviews that confirm that.

            Comment


            • #23
              How much room does the sound clips and channel take up? Sorry if you mentioned it before, just can’t find it. I like your idea.

              Comment


              • #24
                Originally posted by pwade3 View Post
                How much room does the sound clips and channel take up? Sorry if you mentioned it before, just can’t find it. I like your idea.
                The sound clips that I went with and hat channel add 1 5/8" to the wall thickness plus whatever thickness drywall you use. So, with 5/8" drywall, you would add 2 1/4" to the wall. You have to make allowance for outlets and whatever blocking you need to install media and mini split (if you go that route). Here is an example my electrician came up with together with the framer instead of using metal outlet extensions. As indicated all outlets will have putty pads. The extension 2x4 brings the outlet out not quite flush with where the drywall will be after installation of clips, channel and drywall. You will also note how thick the blocking installed is for media (Uneekor Eye Xo and projector along with Mini split being the same thickness). The contractor indicated that when it is done, the blocking will be flush with the drywall.

                Comment


                • #25
                  Example of Putty Pad outlets, cabling & outlet box, putty paddded to joists and blocking added to close air gap at base of garage. Once I get framing inspection, I will post Rockwool installation and related sound clips and hat channel. When doing things like room additions, it is very important that you look for every potential source of noise leaks and take steps to address during construction,l (like we did with bathroom flooring issue above and addition blocking to cut off air leaks at base of garage).

                  Comment


                  • #26
                    All holes in the wall for AC piping and electrical wires were foamed in to prevent sound leaks (and insects). Rockwool insulation installation examples shown here. That takes a while because every piece has to be cut to fit the point of installation. Now every hole is now insulated and every outlet and junction box has been putty padded. The side walls have R15 Rockwool and the ceiling with have R38 Rockwool.

                    Comment


                    • #27
                      Examples of vapor barrier installed over Rockwool, sound clip installation and hat channel installation. Note also, I had the electrician install light cans that allow the insulation to be butted right up against the light can. This goes a long way toward cutting down sound leaks through the metal light cans.
                      Attached Files

                      Comment


                      • #28
                        Your making great progress. Well done. You should well before I get to lockup which is perfect as then I will look forward to your evaluation of sound levels in real time. The box beside the light in picture 3, is that attic access or cable junction box?

                        Comment


                        • #29
                          Originally posted by pwade3 View Post
                          Your making great progress. Well done. You should well before I get to lockup which is perfect as then I will look forward to your evaluation of sound levels in real time. The box beside the light in picture 3, is that attic access or cable junction box?
                          That box will have power outlets (controlled by On/Off wall switch), Uneekor cable, HDMI cable, and outlets for CAT 6 cables should I ever have a cabling issue. There will be three extra CAT 6 outlets in the box. They can be converted into HDMI if necessary due to HDMI cable failure. The box is a great way to control cabling for projector and Uneekor. You will only see about 2 feet of cables coming from Uneekor and Projector into the countersunk media outlet box.
                          Last edited by Kaos; 04-08-2021, 03:40 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #30
                            Here are a few examples of fully installed sound clips and resilient channel.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X