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DIY sportscreen

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  • DIY sportscreen

    has anybody been able to replicate a roll up screw like seen at www.thesportscreen.com but made with their own parts to try and save a few bucks?

    i was thinking about somehow using a bevel gearbox and trying it on my own or should I just not be cheap and pony up for a custom sport screen

  • #2
    I have not seen anyone who has done this, but it could certainly be done. I thought about trying to fabricate my own version of a SportScreen but I ended up just ordering one instead. I have a manual SS, which takes about 10 seconds to roll down and back up. They also sell the automated one where you push a remote button and it rolls down. Cool, but not worth the extra money, IMO.

    I think you are on the right track with a bevel gear. I think the trick would be figuring out what to use as the roller section so that it doesn't bow in the middle. The SS uses a large diameter lightweight metal roller and the SS attaches directly to it via velcro.

    Before I bought mine when I was looking at building my own, I remember reading a bunch of info at home theater websites where guys had made their own projector screens. Somewhere I read about one that was a roll up screen using a drill motor. You might get some ideas from home theater DIY sites. But keep in mind those projection screens probably weigh less than an impact screen does.

    I hope that helps a little.

    -Pat

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    • #3
      Looked into it briefly, but after calculating the cost for a tubular motor and a 10-16 foot aluminum metal cylinder, it only saved me $200. Granted I'm a novice and had trouble finding the right parts so someone more knowledgeable might be able to cut the costs down further.

      Main cost I had was buying a strong enough tubular motor that could handle the wt of the sportscreen mesh and an impact screen. Most of the cheap tubular motors were built for standard window blinds.

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      • #4
        Jtangm04, Yes, a motor that could handle the weight off the screen would offset some of the cost savings, but I do think that the manual version that cranks down could be replicated cheaply by someone with the time and knowledge. I thought about giving it a shot, but decided to just buy and use my time somewhere else. But I'd love to see someone give it a shot.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Pat S.
          I have not seen anyone who has done this, but it could certainly be done. I thought about trying to fabricate my own version of a SportScreen but I ended up just ordering one instead. I have a manual SS, which takes about 10 seconds to roll down and back up. They also sell the automated one where you push a remote button and it rolls down. Cool, but not worth the extra money, IMO.

          I think you are on the right track with a bevel gear. I think the trick would be figuring out what to use as the roller section so that it doesn't bow in the middle. The SS uses a large diameter lightweight metal roller and the SS attaches directly to it via velcro.

          Before I bought mine when I was looking at building my own, I remember reading a bunch of info at home theater websites where guys had made their own projector screens. Somewhere I read about one that was a roll up screen using a drill motor. You might get some ideas from home theater DIY sites. But keep in mind those projection screens probably weigh less than an impact screen does.

          I hope that helps a little.

          -Pat
          The drill route is probably the way that it would be most cost effective. A pulley or gear system could be used to reduce the load on the drill.

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          • #6
            After lots of research I decided just to order a sportscreen. It is worth knowing others have been successful with this approach and so I don’t spend money to fail and get a sportscreen later anyway lol

            my next hurdle is how to install it “lower” I have 10.5 foot ceilings and want it installed around a height of 9 feet so the black screen and my impact screen have a couple wraps around he bar to ensure it doesn’t go anywhere. My impact screen is 13x10 and I ordered the height extension with my sportscreen

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            • #7
              When you guys ordered your sport screen, did you just purchase the hardware, or get the screen as well? I currently have an the SQ screen from par2pro, and don't use any kind of netting or backing for it. I have had no issues with it. So I am wondering if I can do without the screen part to save on cost and just see if they will sell me the hardware for the manual sport screen.

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