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Best ProTee Stance Mat??

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  • Best ProTee Stance Mat??

    All ProTee system users...

    I'm looking for stance mat recommendations, for a good stance mat to go around my ProTee sensor mat, and provide me a good feel to hit off of? Let me know what you're using and how it's working for you, how much it costs, and where you purchased, etc, please...

    I'm looking for something I can cut a hole in to place around my ProTee Sensor. I see these Quattro mats are 5'x5' and not sure that is big enough? Likely it is, but is the height is 1 and 1/4" thick.. Just wondering what other ProTee system users have done, if they created their own stance mat?

    Thanks in advance,
    -Brett

  • #2
    Simple to buid your own, make sure whatever you build you cut the hole out carefully and squarely for a sensor mat otherwise you may face path and face issues if it is a bit skew wiff!

    Comment


    • Brettster
      Brettster commented
      Editing a comment
      Yep, thanks... I also have the issue of the concrete foundation being slightly unlevel (leaning down toward the screen about 1"), which will require either shimming of the floor underlayment I lay on top of the 2x4 flooring frame, or pouring out liquid leveling material and waiting for it to harden - YIKES

  • #3
    PROTEE UK is there one mat better than another, for durability, easy of fit (for example exactly the same thickness, (or easy to build to exact same thickness) of the ProTee Sensor mat? Then, I'm down to pricing, which is the best to go with for the price? I'd rather put that extra money saved into a projector/screen right and building materials for the rest of the build, and a good mini-split (heating/cooling unit) which will likely run close to $1,000.

    Comment


    • #4
      I would build a timber frame, this way you can level with floor without screeding. Build outer frame 2 inch x 1 inch or 3 inch x 2 inch timber, fix to floor, lay inside 50mm insulation board, lay out sensors and cut holes and channels for cable, lay 18mm timer sheet or interlocking floor boards, fix around perimeter, lay out sensors again, carefully and squrely cut through the boards to match the holes in sub base. Bring the main sensor mat up so that it is around 20mm proud of floor, putting sensor level, lay turf around 15-16mm pile height PE turf is best. this will leave the main mat 4-mm proud of finished surface. Putting sensor, cut out the full square of turf, add slots a few mm wider and longer than needed and double tape to the putting sensor for a nice cover
      Attached Files

      Comment


      • Brettster
        Brettster commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks! Exactly what I need... I see you have your cup cut out to the side as well, which is what I will need to do... Thanks again... looking forward to getting this built up... American (Imperial) measurements are a little different... as I find those measurements, I'll post what I used. For example 3 inch/x2 inch timber, that would be a 2x4 in American speak, which actually measures 1 1/2" by 3 1/2", etc...

    • #5
      PROTEE UK

      A couple of questions as I'm finally finding the time to get the buildout finished...

      I would build a timber frame, this way you can level with floor without screeding. Build outer frame 2 inch x 1 inch or 3 inch x 2 inch timber, fix to floor, lay inside 50mm insulation board, lay out sensors and cut holes and channels for cable, lay 18mm timer sheet or interlocking floor boards, fix around perimeter, lay out sensors again, carefully and squrely cut through the boards to match the holes in sub base.
      You say lay inside 50mm insulation board, are you saying here that I find 50mm insulation board and lay that inside the timber frame throughout? 50mm = approx 2" thick... is there some reason for insulating the floor, as I was hoping to leave it empty with nothing between the bare concrete bottom and the 3/4" underlayment boards I am laying on top of the timbers? I was thinking to maybe lay some plastic sheeting on the concrete floor as a water barrier, just in case, but then leaving those cavities empty making it easier to cut-out cups, and simulator inserts to drop in.

      Bring the main sensor mat up so that it is around 20mm proud of floor, putting sensor level, lay turf around 15-16mm pile height PE turf is best. this will leave the main mat 4-mm proud of finished surface. Putting sensor, cut out the full square of turf, add slots a few mm wider and longer than needed and double tape to the putting sensor for a nice cover
      I'm not sure what you mean by 'proud of floor', does that mean 20mm ABOVE the flooring (which is about 3/4")? And with the putting sensor you say 4mm 'proud of finished surface', is that 4mm ABOVE (about 1/8" above the finished surface)? I just looked up 'proud of', it is above, so I'm still not sure why I would want the main sensor 3/4" higher (above) the main stance mat? Would it be better to have both sensors exactly level with the finished surface?

      Comment


      • #6
        Using insulation boards remove the need for and timber floor joists. They are easy to cut through to run cable channels and cut out you spaces for mats.
        we lay interlocking floor boards over the top and fix at the sides.
        Nothing to do with insulating but building a solid base which is easy to work and takes no time to build.

        Main sensor is best left 4mm above the finished floor level as it avoids catching your floor turf on follow through and tearing it.

        Putting sensor level with the timber floor as you will lay grass over it.

        Comment


        • #7
          PROTEE UK

          I'm not sure I understand, you say 'insulation boards allow you to have no need for timber floor joists', then you say: 'Putting sensor level with timber floor' as you will grass over it? I think you are meaning that you do not use timber for the floor joists, but instead use insulation boards for that, and then lay real timber boards over the top (as flooring/underlayment).

          I'm still not sure what you mean by 'insulation boards'? Are these similar to American 2x4 boards but made of insulation material? I'm not sure we have anything like that in USA, and if we did I would not be comfortable with that being stable as with real timber/boards (2x4 laid on their sides) for structure. Or, are you meaning that the 'insulation boards' you speak of are like fiber/wood laid over the top of the 2x4 timber boards, which can easily be cut into? Again, I don't see how that insulation board would provide solid structure for heavy 220lb American golfers? I don't want the wood (either the 2x4 boards, or the flooring boards laid over it) to have any 'give' to it - as I don't want it to feel not natural like real solid ground... I'm expecting that I will lay the foam interlocking tiles over the flooring boards so that there is some 'sponginess' or 'give' to the feel on my feet, but that is all.

          I'm planning on 2x4 boards laid throughout for structure underneath, I don't mind if I have to cut through them to install cables/channels and spaces for mats, etc... and then laying 3/4" thick construction grade plywood over that for sturdy flooring. All this is placed over a concrete pad, with plastic over it to prevent water seepage into the boards.

          Do you have any pictures of a build in process, so I can see what you are speaking of? I'm at a point where I need to get this part done, and it will cost me a lot of money, I want to get it right, from the start

          Thanks in advance,
          -Brett

          Comment


          • #8
            Email me brettster.
            insuktion boards used in construction can hold tons so lbs no issue there.
            You may not have interlocking floorboards in the US but here we simply build an outer frame, install the insulation boards loose, make cut outs for mats, cables etc, interlocking floor boards over the top and fixed to outer frame.
            Cut through the boards to reveal the cutouts in the insulation boards for mats and run cables throught he channels.

            The floors are solid.
            Attached Files

            Comment


            • Brettster
              Brettster commented
              Editing a comment
              PM'd you Jamie... looking for links on where you buy 1.) insulation boards, and 2.) interlocking floor boards that describes them for sale (dimensions, etc) in a store in UK, so I can see if we sell something like that here in USA.

          • #9
            PROTEE UK Hello, I’m still waiting on an answer to this - can you please let me know a link to where you buy this stuff in a U.K. online store, so I can see if we have it in USA?

            I am especially wondering about 1.) Insulation board, and 2.) interlocking floorboards 3.) putting turf you used, and is that glued down on top of the interlocking boards? If you had some links, that gave me specifications on these materials I would greatly appreciate it so I could try to locate them here locally, near Chicago, USA, or could order from somewhere in USA, if I have to.

            i see from your pics that you’ve got this down to a science and I think it would help me tremendously when setting up my own flooring with the ProTee Sensors embedded into flooring at just the right height.

            Comment


            • Kmurray
              Kmurray commented
              Editing a comment
              Brettster
              Not wishing to put words into Protees mouth but I think the type of insulation boards they are referring to is Kingspan Insulation, I would imagine that a similar product would be available in North America.
              Heres a link to a supplier in the UK.https://insulation4less.co.uk/produc...iABEgLNc_D_BwE

              We used shedloads of it in our studio build and it is awesome, our studio is toasty in the Scottish winter and our boards were foil backed which helps cut down the temp on the good days that we get. We installed it the walls, ceiling and floor spaces. Our garden is south facing so gets the full hit of the sun , so the insulation really helps.

              Can't really help with the other items as not familiar with the protee set up.

          • #10
            Kmurray thank you so much, I've located Kingspan in the USA... sorry for the delay in getting back up here to read your reply, I've had so many setbacks recently, Mom's health, and now extremely high temperatures in Midwest USA preventing me from working further on my shed...

            I see the KingSpan insulation is also available in Georgia, USA, here's website: http://www.kingspaninsulation.us

            That should help me some, but there are other aspects about the pictures that PROTEE UK has shown (I believe this is Jamie, whom I've conversed with before, so not sure of his health as to why he's not answering me?).

            Anyway, every aspect of what he has shown from his build is perfect to me, for example having the thicker rough/turf around the edges, I would like to do that as well, and then find out exactly what turf he used for the rest of the flooring, as it matches up perfectly with the embedded ProTee sensor mats. I know I can use trial/error, and just buy what I need, and try to get it right, but that could be a long process - and it could be so much easier/shorter to accomplish if I had a Parts/Pieces list of every item used in his build shown above - as I can see he's got this down.

            That's my next step, as I try to do as best I can to match what he's done, and shown here... if I can't get to the bottom of it, I'll just use trial and error...

            Anyone else up here who has a ProTee install with 2 embedded sensors, (1 for ball striking and 1 for putting), please let me know, I'll also refer back to what gene438 said some time ago about his own flooring, using 2x4's on their side, and then laying flooring over that, until I get it right.

            Thanks in advance for any advice, etc...
            Market leading manufacturer of energy efficient and moisture management products, high performance insulation, building wraps, and pre-insulated ductwork.
            Last edited by Brettster; 07-25-2020, 11:07 PM.

            Comment


            • #11
              Brettster,
              I have replied by email.
              That site is very old.
              We supply the turfs but can not ship to the US.
              The adverts on my old personal site were affiliations I had back then.

              I am happy to reply to you by email but if a delay it is not because I am ignoring etc, my health is fine just very very busy.

              Comment


              • #12
                Thanks for reply PROTEE UK

                I finally found the Kingspan 2inch insulation board at Lowe's in the USA, here's the link,
                https://www.lowes.com/pd/Kingspan-In...tion/999972968

                For the 3 inch X 2inch, in the USA that would be what we call a 2x4, which is actually 3.375" x 1.5" (3 and 6/16 inch X 1 and 1/2 inch) - don't you love our measurements? They are called 2x4, but are not really 2 inch by 4 inch, instead they are the dimensions after they are finished cut which is why they are the odd measurement.

                For flooring, we use what is called 'underlayment' (plywood). When converted to imperial measurements it would be 3/4" (3/4 inch) plywood.

                So, I will try to piece all this together to get the right heights, but it's going to take some more calculations, which I will put up later, or speak to Gene up here, about how he did it, link to follow.

                I also wonder about this, one of the used units I purchased included a Plexiglass cover that fit over the sensor unit underneath the hitting surface, to prevent pieces of things from falling into the hitting sensor. Is that useful, or is that not a problem anymore? I can't imagine that would happen frequently enough to require it, maybe you can tell me - do you have a vacuum handy for clearing out any pieces that may have fallen into the sensor, possibly covering up one of the sensors?

                Thanks again Jamie, you've given me great information... just need to pull it all together, and buy materials and start building once the temperatures here drop enough that I can do it...

                I will continue to post here, with pictures as my build progresses, so others have reference point of doing it in USA/Imperial measurements.
                Last edited by Brettster; 07-25-2020, 11:14 PM.

                Comment


                • #13
                  Hi Brettster. I'm new to the forum but might have some answers for you. Are you still building or are you all set now?

                  Comment


                  • #14
                    jeffreylight

                    Originally posted by jeffreylight View Post
                    Hi Brettster. I'm new to the forum but might have some answers for you. Are you still building or are you all set now?
                    I'm still building... would like to hear your answers. You can post here, or PM me, but please do let me know how you did yours? Also, if you have photos, would be helpful too and links to turf, etc? As I'm told we have to use PE turf, and not Vinyl as it will reflect light and cause all kinds of problems with the ProTee sensors.

                    Thanks in advance!

                    Comment

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